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The BIGGEST Rose Bush in the  

World!

                        Located in Tombstone, Arizona

 

           Thanks to Henry & Mary Gee from Scotland back in 1885 we have this Rose Bush thriving in the middle of the desert.

(and as soon as I can find the picture with me standing next to the Rose I will post it)

  GNOMES

The myth is that they lived underground during the daylight guarding their treasures and would come out at night. If at any time they get caught out in the daylight they would turn to stone which gives the idea of Garden Gnomes. The Gnome popularity spread from Germany threw out Europe when Sir Charles Isham introduced them to the United Kingdom back in 1847.

 FAIRIES

The story begins in 1893 when the Japanese Pavilion at the Chicago World’s Fair where they used the idea for a bonsai dish garden. The popularity soon took off when the New York times featured the miniature creations in an article and the rest became history!

Disney World 2015

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ST. PHOCAS: Gardners,Agricultural workers,Farm workers,Farmers and Fieldhands

ST. ISIDORE: Farmers and the City of Madrid

ST. FRANCIS of ASSISI: Animals and Environment

ST. URBAN: Vineyards and Grape Growers

ST. VALETINE: Lovers, Bee Keepers and small Intimate Gardens

ST.FIACRE: Herb Gardens and Men who like to Garden

ST. PATRICK: Ireland and Organic Gardening

ST. ANTHONY of PADUA: Harvest and Lost Animals

ST. DOROTHY: Horticulture, Brewers, Brides, Florist and Gardners

The Power of One Tree - The Very Air We Breathe

Posted by Joanna Mounce Stancil, U.S. Forest Service in Forestry

Jun 03, 2019

 

              Covering millions of acres of forested lands in the West, the Ponderosa Pine can grow to heights of over 200 feet.

The second in a series of blogs honoring the United Nation’s 2015 International Day of Forests

On Saturday, March 21, the U.S. Forest Service will celebrate the United Nation’s International Day of Forests

. With such an important worldwide recognition of all forests do for us humans, the Forest Service would like folks to ask themselves: Do I really know how much trees contribute to my daily life?

Or, in another words, what is the power of one tree?

Just as we humans are comprised of many parts functioning together allowing us to do wondrous things, the anatomy of a tree is just as wondrous, empowering them with super hero qualities.

What am I talking about?  A tree has the ability to provide an essential of life for all living things on our planet – oxygen, and the power to remove harmful gases like carbon dioxide making the air we breathe healthier.

Here is how it works:

To keep it simple a tree is comprised of its leaves, stems, trunk and its roots.  When you look at a tree, note that about five percent of the tree is comprised of its leaves, 15 percent its stems, 60 percent goes into its trunk and 20 percent is devoted to its roots.

Here is the super hero part. Through a process called photosynthesis, leaves pull in carbon dioxide and water and use the energy of the sun to convert this into chemical compounds such as sugars that feed the tree.  But as a by-product of that chemical reaction oxygen is produced and released by the tree.  It is proposed that one large tree can provide a day’s supply of oxygen for up to four people.

Trees also store carbon dioxide in their fibers helping to clean the air and reduce the negative effects that this CO2 could have had on our environment. According to the Arbor Day Foundation

, in one year a mature tree will absorb more than 48 pounds of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and release oxygen in exchange.

So next time you take a deep breath of air give credit to a tree or hug a tree in thanks for what it gives us – the very air we breathe.

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